Welcome, Beau!

He’s about a year old, this sweet, small, yet long-legged Beagle mix. He’d been found sick and starving by a woman two counties away who’d contacted our Humane Society to ask for help with him when her own county could not. Our Humane Society is an amazing no-kill shelter that opens its arms and hearts to all animals in need, and they offered help. Then they called me because they knew I was interested in adopting a dog ever since my 21-year-old Hilary cat died last year.

IMG_20160531_143238679

“He’s much different than the usual animal that comes in,” the shelter staff person said. I spent a few hours visiting with “Sonny” the next day, noting his sweet demeanor, my ability to keep up with his walking pace, and most of all those endearing beagle eyes when they stared into my own eyes. Without hesitation I told the staff person on our return, “Yes, I want to adopt him.”

I haven’t owned a dog in three decades, not since my children were young and we lived on the farm, and raised border collies. In the late 90s, I swerved onto some unplanned roads in my life’s journey that led me away from the farm. I decided I’d have cats for pets, not wanting to leave a dog home alone for 8-10 hours a day while I worked.

Harriet, a Maine-Coon-former-barn-cat, hopped into my car the day I moved from the farm, and shortly gave birth to Hilary, a beautiful tabby who wanted to remain as she’d been born: an only child. In passing years, I discovered Button, abandoned in my back yard when he was about six days old. Coincidentally, he wanted to be an only child, too, and given time the two cats eventually achieved a quiet truce whereby they could pass by each other without a snarl or swipe.

When Hilary died, I sensed that Button missed her company despite their ever-seeming indifference to each other. Then I got an idea as I watched Button acting at ease with my daughter’s two dogs, and thought a dog might work well.

A month later I brought Beau home. Button froze by the glass door as he saw Beau shyly approach. After giving them sight time through the window, I opened the door a few inches and we soon entered the house. Button hissed softly, Beau was silent as he inspected this new-to-him environment, and that was it. Since that time three weeks ago, they have become respectfully curious and friendly with each other. Beau sits to my left on the love seat at night as I watch television and knit, in the spot that used to be Button’s. Button relinquished the spot with relative grace, and moved to the largIMG_20160601_120801609er nearby couch. He’s retained his spot by my feet as I work at the computer and still sleeps on my bed each night.

I love having a dog again. Button might say, “Oh, he’s okay; I’m just glad he’s not another cat.”

And Beau? Well, I think he might say, “It’s good to have food and water every day, I’m glad my skin doesn’t drive me crazy itching anymore, my new human loves me a lot and I love her. And the cat? Well, he’s interesting, but what was my human thinking when she named us?  Button and Beau? I guess she thought we were cute! Whatever. I’m just glad to be home.”

Advertisements

About Mary Jo Doig

At the turn of the millennium, I arrived at a cross-road that brought me a splendid, if unforeseen place, almost as if I were a traveler on Robert Frost's The Road Less Traveled. I was single again, my three children were grown and building their lives, I'd experienced a health issue and was working on an improved lifestyle. I also ached to do two other things: (1) change my long human services career in upstate New York's Catskill Mountains, where winter seemed to be at least seven months out of every year, and (2) move to a warmer place in the universe. My decision: did I want to continue on the path I'd been following pretty much all my life, or could I gather my then-fragile courage and start life brand new somewhere else? These were scary thoughts for a single woman in her late 50s. Five hundred miles away, though, I fell in love with a new mountain range, Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, where I knew not a soul except my daughter who was attending college in the Shenandoah Valley, and I moved. I rented a tiny cabin on a mountain in the woods and lived there in solitude for two years, working in a new career by day and, when home, communing with the incredible natural beauty that surrounded me. There I also began to write my life stories, which were aching for release. I joined the Story Circle Network in early 2001, a rich place in cyberspace for women life writers, where I strengthened my written voice and began sharing my stories. I grew there in so many ways and today I'm a long-time editor for the "True Words from Real Women" section of the quarterly Journal, as well as a reader and reviewer of women's memoirs for the SCN Book Review site, another unique place in cyberspace. Then, next year, I’ll again be honored to be program chair for our Stories from the Heart national conference in Austin, TX. I have so many loves: first, my three children: my son, Chip and daughter, Polly, both in Virginia; and my youngest daughter, Susan, in Florida, and also dear family and friends. I must also include my cats Hilary (20) and Button (5). Sometimes I foster cats and kittens for the Humane Society, but Button prefers me not to. My hobbies include reading, writing, editing, cooking, gardening, quilting, knitting, biking, and simply being with the profound beauty of the mountains that embrace my small two acres in the Blue Ridge. The life stories I began writing in 2001 have grown deeper with time, re-writes, and personal growth. Now, all these years later, I believe I've sliced through the layers to reach the heart of my story, and am presently working on the final revision of my memoir, Stitching a Patchwork Life.
This entry was posted in Animal friends, Bovina Stories, Change, Friendship, Grace, Gratitude. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Welcome, Beau!

  1. flossiehanna says:

    AS an animal owner of two dogs, I know how animals work these things out. I also know the comfort and company they give us. Because of this, my heart resonated with ours as I read this entry. Thank you. Mary D. w-ecircle6

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Delightful story, Mary Jo – and the pics! Beau is much cuter than Sonny for a name, especially given the Button connection. Looks like you are heading into lots of companionable hours! This stirs up many memories of when we brought a Labrador into our cat-centric household several years back. The cat who most disdained the other cats walked right up to the dog and rubbed noses. Opposites attracting? Or maybe dogs just don’t seem “competition”?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mary Jo Doig says:

    Thank you, Jazz. I think both theories hold water. Meanwhile, I am enjoying having a cat and a dog.

    Like

  4. Linda Hoye says:

    Oh how fun, Mary Jo! Enjoy the company of your new family member. You are both blessed in having the other.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Button and Beau are clever names for sure. Hope they bring you years of pleasure. They are fortunate to have you. And I’d have to say you are lucky they get along – our senior cat’s (Wanda) tolerance level is still above the edge with the nameless kitten and it’s been nearly 6 months.

    Like

  6. Mary Jo Doig says:

    I remember those days with Hilary and Button. It took quite awhile for them to chill. Hopefully your two will get there sooner!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s